Bruja y mujer

Bruja de Corazón
he called me
witch
and I thought
bruja
sounded better
if we must
do some
name calling
let’s say it
right
I had every
instinct
of a playground
fight
when he went
for my
corazón
tearing away
at my chambers
bleeding
his permanence
in damage
calling me
all the bad
in the world
corrupting
his good
how many times
he slipped
under
my trance
I wept
from pain
as nature
would
he called that
the evil
part
of me
being taken out
of context
the candles
I lit
in prayer
mistaken
for spells
and possession
he called me
ball and chain
and I thought
lover
sounded better
his body
traces of warm
from mine
forever
he can’t deny
me ever
leaving him
cold
he scoffed
at my tears
and I cried
harder
taking a wrong
turn
driving while
broken hearted
I could not see
past his judgement
of me being
una mujer
y bruja
as a bad thing
intuitively
when in reality
I am
all that
in nature
and magic
in lovemaking
and passion
storms forming
rivers swelling
my soft yielding
deep connecting
stars glistening
moon glowing
flowers opening
hummingbirds surrounding
earth understanding
me
thinking
in the end
he could be
right
soy una bruja
de corazón.

“Missing in action was the female spirit. The misogyny behind the hunts was so devastating that women and men who supported female values were completely vanquished. Sex crimes against women dramatically increased: perpetrators knew that if a woman pressed charges, they need only to claim bewitchment to have the accusation turned against her.”

“The Hammer explained in detail how to distinguish a witch from a God-fearing Christian. Upon arriving in a village, witch hunters hired informers to report mysterious illnesses, deaths, misfortunes (hail storms, crop failures, death of livestock), or the sudden onset of impotence (a favorite). Widows, spinsters, sexually attractive women (the ones who could really cast a spell over men), healers, magicians, as well “scolds,” “crones,” and “hags,” were then arrested as prime suspects.”

  • The Alphabet Versus the Goddess, Leonard Shalin

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1468 The Pope defines witchcraft as crimen exceptum, removing  all legal limits to torture.

1523 One thousand witches burn in a single year in the diocese of Como.

1585 Witch burnings in two villages leave one female inhabitant each.

1581-1591 Nine hundred burn in Lorraine.

1603 William Harvey assists at the examination of witches.

1609 The whole population of Navarre is declared witches.

1622-1623 Johann George II, Prince Bishop, builds a house for the trying of witches at Bamberg, where six hundred burn.

1628 One hundred fifty–eight burned at Wurzburg.

1670 Rouen witch trials

1738 Dean of Faculty of Law at Rostock demands that witches be extirpated by fire and sword.

1745 Witch Trial at Lyon, five sentenced to death.

1749 Sister Maria Renata executed and burned.

1775 Anna Maria Schnagel executed for witchcraft.

  • Women and Nature, Susan Griffin


c/s tara evonne trudell

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ARTIST’S STATEMENT
mexico_meAs a multimedia artist, Tara Evone Trudell weaves poetry, photography, film, and audio components into her work in order to express creative visions that address social issues. It is vital in her role as an artist that she represent and advocate for earth and humanity in an effort to stimulate action. As a photographer, she approaches photography with a humanistic sensibility in order to discuss and address important social issues especially dealing with the border between the USA and Mexico.  
 
Tara writes poetry to address these troubling issues and to bring a vocal element to her views. She then rolls the poem into paper beads, which allows me to transfer the words on paper into energy and action.  A true transference of energy.
 
Each bead becomes a prayer to honor the word and the subject of the poem. This process provides her an opportunity to connect with her purpose as an artist and to further the changes that she hopes will take place in the world.
Tara Evonne Trudell
Tara Evonne Trudell

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