Nocihuapoh: For the hermanas

Nocihuapoh, Nocihuapoh

Nocihuapoh, Nocihuapoh x2

Huel Tinechximati, Nimitzcihuapotiah x2

Nocihuapoh, Nocihuapoh

Tocihuapoqueh Nimitztlazohtla

Nocihuapoh, Nocihuapoh

Tocihuapoqueh, Tlazocamati

Mi Comadre, Mi Comadre

Mi Comadre, Mi Comadre

Tu Me Conoces, Te reconozco como una mujer como yo

Mi Comadre, Mi Comadre

Nuestras Comadres Te Amamos

Mi Comadre, Mi Comadre

Nuestras Comadres, Te Agradezco (Gracias)

My Sister, My Sister

My Sister, My Sister

You know me well, I accept as a woman like me

My Sister, My Sister

Our Sisters, I Love You

My Sister, My Sister

Our Sisters, I am thankful for you (Thank you)


As we journey through decolonization of our mind and learn, or rather remember, to uncover the power of allowing ourselves to surrender to our heart , we soon find out that every person we come across teaches us a reflection of ourselves that we must either conquer, let go, embrace or celebrate. In my journey, to call someone a sister, a comadre, an hermana is a heart felt and heartbreaking emotion at times. However, neither Spanish nor English could ever encompass what is in my heart for all of the muxeres that have walked the Red Road with me. In sharing and learning our ancestral languages I have felt in the most vulnerable depths of my heart that the languages of our ancestrxs speak to our spirit beyond the colonized languages we have grown accustomed to use to express ourselves. So it is through song that we reconnect with Ometeotl and it is through singing in our native tongues that we feel our spiritual work amplified.

As we prepared to celebrate the commitment of one of our sisters journeys to Alaska to begin the Peace and Dignity Journeys, another comadre shared a post on Facebook about this Nahuatl word:

NOCIHUAPOH which encompasses the connotations of sisterhood, my equal, comadrismo, mi amiga. In front of the sacred fire, in the presence of the beautiful eagle staff of the Peace and Dignity Journeys and the medicine of community praying together, we recorded this song. I say we, because even though it is my voice singing, there were voices before mine that spoke to my heart to reflect this deep appreciation and celebration of SISTERHOOD! We all are doing brave work, NOCIHUAPOH, we are the SEEDS OF CHANGE!


An innovator in performance art and educational programs in Central Texas, Laura offers customized workshops, classes, lectures and projects that engage participants in connecting to an ancestral energy that is still relevant in our modern world. She is the founder of SOUL Sessions, a Hip Hop culture and dance youth program at Austin ISD and a trained facilitator for Xinachtli: Rights of Passage curriculum for young girls . She has coordinated youth programs for the Mexican American Cultural Center, Indigenous Cultures Institute, Alma de Mujer, Indigenous Women’s Network and American Indians in Texas. She is proficient in utilizing the ancestral influence of indigenous culture and Hip Hop to inspire self-expression and healing. She has provided lectures and workshops at the University of Texas in Austin and San Antonio and the San Antonio Public Library. As a traditional healer she facilitates retreats as founder of Yanaguana Mamas and is a co-founder of Kalpulli Ameyaltonal Tejaztlan, an Aztec Dance group preserving the indigenous traditions of Mexico. She is a wife and birth mother of two and co-parent to her husband's first child who proudly embodies matriarchy and embraces the transformational passage of sisterhood as a sacred part of the dance of life.

Laura Yohualtlahuiz Rios Ramirez
An innovator in performance art and educational programs in Central Texas, Laura offers customized workshops, classes, lectures and projects that engage participants in connecting to an ancestral energy that is still relevant in our modern world.  She is the founder of SOUL Sessions, a Hip Hop culture and dance youth program at Austin ISD and a trained facilitator for Xinachtli: Rights of Passage curriculum for young girls . She has coordinated youth programs for the Mexican American Cultural Center, Indigenous Cultures Institute, Alma de Mujer, Indigenous Women’s Network and American Indians in Texas. She is proficient in utilizing the ancestral influence of indigenous culture and Hip Hop to inspire self-expression and healing.  She has provided lectures and workshops at the University of Texas in Austin and San Antonio  and the San Antonio Public Library. As a traditional healer  she facilitates retreats as founder of Yanaguana Mamas and is a co-founder of Kalpulli Ameyaltonal Tejaztlan, an Aztec Dance group preserving the indigenous traditions of Mexico. She is a wife and birth mother of two and co-parent to her husband’s first child who proudly  embodies matriarchy and embraces the transformational passage of sisterhood as a sacred part of the dance of life.

 

 

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